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Peptidomimetics Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions for Therapeutic Development

Author(s):

Gan Zhang, Jessica Andersen and Guillermo Gerona-Navarro*   Pages 1 - 14 ( 14 )

Abstract:


Background: Interactions between proteins play a key role in nearly all cellular process, and therefore, its dysregulation may lead to many different types of cellular dysfunctions. Hence, pathologic Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) constitute highly attractive drug targets and hold great potential for developing novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of incurable human diseases. Unfortunately, the identification of PPI inhibitors is an extremely challenging task, since traditionally used small molecules ligands are mostly unable to cover and anchor on the extensive and flat surfaces that define those binary protein complexes. In contrast, large biomolecules such as proteins or peptides are ideal fits for this so-called “undruggable” sites. However, their poor pharmacokinetic properties have also limited their applications as therapeutics. In this context, peptidomimetic molecules have emerged as an alternative and viable solution to this problem, since they conserve the architectural and structural features of peptides and also exhibit substantially improved pharmacokinetic profiles. Conclusion: In the last decades, a wide array of chemical approaches granting access to conformationally constrained peptides with substantially improved pharmacokinetic profiles have been described, with a special focus on those affording stapled peptides and allowing large-scale macrocyclizations. These peptidomimetic molecules have been successfully applied to target a plethora of biological hosts, which highlights their promising future as novel therapeutics for the treatment of incurable human diseases.

Keywords:

Peptidomimetics Targeting, Protein-Protein Interactions, macrocyclization, pharmacokinetic properties

Affiliation:

Department of Chemistry, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, Department of Chemistry, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, Department of Chemistry, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York



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