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Development and Characterization of Polymeric Peptides for Antibody Tagging of Bacterial Targets

Author(s):

Fresthel Monica M. Climacosa*, Ruby Anne N. King, Bobbie Marie M. Santos and Salvador Eugenio C. Caoili   Pages 1 - 9 ( 9 )

Abstract:


Background: Microbe-binding peptides (MBPs) are currently being investigated to address the problem of antimicrobial resistance. Strategies enhancing their antimicrobial activity have been developed, including peptide dimerization. Here, we present an alternative approach based on peptide polymerization, yielding hapten-labelled polymeric MBPs that mediate tagging of bacteria with anti- hapten antibodies, for enhanced immune recognition by host phagocytes.

Methods: C-terminally amidated analogs of the bacterial-binding peptide IIGGR were synthesized, with or without addition of cysteine residues at both N- and C- termini. Peptides were subjected to oxidizing conditions in a dimethyl-sulfoxide/water solvent system, and polymerization was demonstrated using SDS-PAGE. Peptides were then N-terminally labelled with a trinitrophenyl (TNP) group using trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS). Binding to representative bacteria was demonstrated by ELISA using anti-TNP antibodies and was quantified as half-maximal effective concentration (EC50). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and concentration yielding 50% hemolysis (H50) were estimated. Neutrophil phagocytic index was determined for TNP-labelled polymeric bacterial- binding peptide (Pbac) with anti-TNP antibodies and/or serum complement.

Results: Polydisperse Pbac was synthesized. EC50 was lower for Pbac than for the corresponding monomeric form (Mbac), for both Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. MIC and H50 were >250µg/mL for both Pbac and Mbac. A complement-independent increase in neutrophil phagocytic index was observed for E. coli treated with TNP-labelled Pbac in conjunction with anti-TNP antibodies.

Conclusion: Our data suggest that hapten-labelled polymeric bacterial-binding peptides may easily be produced from even crude synthetic oligopeptide precursors, and that such bacterial-binding peptides in conjunction with cognate anti-hapten antibodies can enhance immune recognition of bacteria by host phagocytes.

Keywords:

Antimicrobial peptides, disulfides, polymerization, haptens, chemically programmable immunity, antibody- dependent cellular phagocytosis, opsonization

Affiliation:

Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Public Health, University of the Philippines, Manila, Biomedical Innovations Research for Translational Health Science (BIRTHS) Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of the Philippines, Manila, Biomedical Innovations Research for Translational Health Science (BIRTHS) Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of the Philippines, Manila, Biomedical Innovations Research for Translational Health Science (BIRTHS) Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of the Philippines, Manila



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